Week 10: Technical Activity – Final Blog Review

So, I am now officially at the point of my blog where all there is left to do is spend the next week or so refining my posts and checking for technical errors.

I have just done a solid once over with the ‘Blog Writing Checklist’ as a guide and picked up on a few silly errors in my writing (Ames 2015).

While I didn’t find any of the questions difficult from the checklist, I do know that when I have had a lot of exposure to my writing, I can easily miss technical errors. From here on out it really will be just a matter of reading over posts, again and again, to the point where I am happy with them before the submission date.

I will also be spending a significant amount of time between now and the 25th commenting and reviewing others blogs. While I have made a really good attempt at interacting with peers about their blogs throughout the semester, I know how helpful it is to have people review your work!

That’s all from me for now!

References

Ames, K 2015, Week 10 – Blog Checklist, course notes, COMM11007: Media Writing, CQUniversity e-courses, http://moodle.cqu.edu.au

Week 10: Technical Activity – Final Blog Review

Week Nine – Technical Activity: Passive and Active Voice

I didn’t find this quiz difficult at all. All of the responses I wrote in relation to the questions were more or less identical to the ‘correct’ answers outlined.

I think this quiz definitely highlighted a point of difference between writing styles that I find very interesting. Academic writing for the most part is concerned with the use of passive writing, and avoiding ‘absolute’ statements (UNC 2015). Academic writing is concerned with carefully constructing sentences which appropriately reference the ideas and findings of others, all the while creating a well-supported argument of your own.

In direct contrast, media writing is all about using active writing, clearly defined points and simple easy to understand sentences (Hamilton University 2015). Focused on key information and ‘newsworthiness’ media writing cuts to what matters – rather than the academic writing tendency to wade back and forth between findings and other scholarly suggestions.

While I didn’t struggle through this quiz by any means, it really highlighted to me how to I do have that tendency towards a passive style of writing. It’s a good mental note for me to take – especially in the coming weeks as I review my blog for submission. My goal from here on out is to review each of my posts to make sure I am using that active writing style the media genre favours.

Reference

Business Writing Centre 1997, ‘Passive and active voice’, viewed 4 September 2015, http://www.businesswriting.com/tests/activepassive.htm

Hamilton University 2015, ‘The seven deadly sins of writing’, viewed 4 September 2015, https://www.hamilton.edu/writing/seven-sins-of-writing/the-first-deadly-sin-passive-voice

University of North Carolina (UNC) 2015, ‘Passive voice’, viewed 4 September 2015, http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/passive-voice/

Week Nine – Technical Activity: Passive and Active Voice

Week Eight – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

I just completed the quiz for week eight. It took me two attempts to get 100% right, as I scored 80% on my first attempt.

The first question I got wrong was about the fight near Jack’s Hotel. I disagree with the first suggestion in the feedback as I don’t think ‘next to’ is more accurate than ‘near’. I feel like it might be a more ‘descriptive’ way of wording it, but I don’t think it is necessarily more correct. I do however understand that the word ‘brawl’ is an exaggeration of fight, so that does make sense to me and would indeed, make option A more correct.

The second question I got wrong relates to the question about the women from Japan, where the ‘of’ was considered redundant. I just personally prefer using that extra word in that instance as it sounds better to me that way.

In some ways I can’t help but feel a little frustrated by these quizzes. It seems so nitty-gritty all the time, when it really is a matter of style. I guess that some people would argue that the details are what matters, but in I do find it tiresome in some cases.

I imagine I am not alone in my thoughts.

Reference

Hicks, W 2013, English for journalists, Routledge, London, England.

Week Eight – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

Week Seven – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

I have just completed both quizzes for week seven.

One of the questions I got wrong this week, was in spelling minuscule. As soon as I saw the right answer, it just hit me. I think it comes from a strategy that I was taught in primary school, which was to sound words out. But as I am sure everyone knows that doesn’t always work. But oh, well! Hopefully I have learned my lesson! I did think it was interesting that the feedback suggested that more people are using the spelling I chose. I really like how language evolves over time and with use!

The second question I got wrong on my first attempt was the one relating to the use of principal. It just goes to show how important context is with the use of some words. It’s easy to trip up and not consider context when you are quickly reading over a sentence. This again reminds me that I really need to slow down when completing these quizzes, and take the time to consider all the elements individually.


In the second quiz I got 100% on my first attempt! I was really excited, especially because I really found the chapter on style interesting. I find the technical details of writing so tedious, so to read about style and the use of style in effective writing was a great change. I really enjoyed the details about style, and responded to the four key elements of suitability, simplicity, precision and poise (Hicks 2013). From this course I know that I will take away a better understanding and greater appreciation for the technical aspects of writing – but I also think I will become a more stylistically sound writer.

Reference

Hicks, W 2013, English for journalists, London Routledge, New York

Week Seven – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

Week Six – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

I think I did well this week in my first attempts at the quizzes. I have always really struggled with the finer points of grammar, so to put it to the test was an interesting challenge for me. For both quizzes I got 80% on my first attempts, eventually making it to that 100% goal!

Quiz 6A

After reading the feedback to this question and where I went wrong I completely understand it now. It is important I think for me to remind myself that conventions all work and tie in together. Had I really taken the time to appreciate the sentence structure and what was going on, I could have easily gotten this question right the first time.


Completely misread the question at the time and it was a foolish mistake to make. I know better than that!

Quiz 6B

The first question I got wrong here, about the ellipsis was really just a silly mistake on my behalf. I really find that unless I stop and really slow down in reading quiz questions I end up making dumb mistakes like this. It’s a hard lesson to learn, and unfortunately for me it seems it hasn’t quite sunk in yet.

In the second case, I think I was just so ‘in-the-zone’ having recently written my news story and media release that I chose option d). Having read over the feedback and explanation, I appreciate the error that I made and understand where I went wrong.

References

Hicks, W 2013, English for journalists, Routledge, London, England

Week Six – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

Week Five – Technical Activity: Quiz Responses

I found that I had a lot of trouble with both quizzes this week.

Reporting speech turned out to be much more confusing than I thought it would be. On my first attempt, I scored 50% – which by my standards is a very poor attempt. I really made an effort to read over the questions I had wrong to learn from them. Finer grammar detailing and the use of ‘says vs. said’ is where I found myself struggling the most.

On my second attempt I scored 90% failing to get a question about closing quotation marks right! I am happy to report, that on my third attempt that I was able to hit that 100% mark! In the second quiz, I scored 50% on my first attempt. Failing to really absorb the lessons of the textbook, I made a bunch of silly errors across a variety of questions. Determined, I re-read the chapter, and on my second attempt scored 100%.

The grammatical elements of media writing is certainly more complex than I thought they would be. I have always felt comfortable with my grasp on writing, but it is becoming more apparent to me just how different media writing is.

I have a feeling that I will need to revisit many of my posts to ensure that my writing is reflective of these standards.

References

Hicks, W 2013, English for journalists, Routledge, London, England.

Week Five – Technical Activity: Quiz Responses

Week Four – Technical Activity: Quiz Response

I thought I did okay in this week’s quiz. On my first attempt I got a score of 7/10 – which I was quite happy with. I did however have some issues with the questions that I got wrong.

For example, on my first attempt, the following question wrong:

Question2

Surely “All of the above” is the most correct response to this question? While it does say in the text (Hicks 2013, pp. 42) that it is ludicrous and unnecessary – it is also redundant, over descriptive and verbose. If we are to pick the most correct answer, I strongly believe it would be “All of the above”.

Another question that I got wrong on my first attempt was:

Question1

Again, I chose which I felt was the best option relating to accuracy. The feedback in relation to the question states that writing for brevity should not be so brief as to cause confusion – but in instances such as this, I feel as though you would have expanded further in more sentences if the extra information was important. I disagree with the wording of the initial question in terms of requesting accuracy if the intention was to include all the components of the statement.

In reflection, I seem to have a love/hate relationship with these quizzes. I know from reading other students blogs, many other people feel the same. It is all a learning experience though. On my second attempt I got 100% – so looking forward to next week’s quiz.

References

Hicks, W 2013, English for journalists, Routledge, London, England.

Week Four – Technical Activity: Quiz Response